Tongue and Cheek Episode 1 (Phatics)
Tongue and Cheek Episode 2: Breath and Incidental Vocalizations—with Jonathan Gordon— (Vocalise: Producing)
Tongue and Cheek Episode 3: Articulating, Containing, Hesitating—with Morgan Garrett— (Vocalise: Shaping)
Tongue and Cheek Episode 11: Offsite (Vocalise)
Tongue and Cheek Episode 13: Cordially (Socialise)
Tongue and Cheek Episode 14: Valve Lash (Vocalise)
Tongue and Cheek Episode 16: Waist Voice—with David Dixon— (Vocalise)
Tongue and Cheek Episode 18: Borrowing Tellings—with Dan J. Ruppel (Ventriloquize)
Tongue and Cheek Episode 19: Resonators—with Zack Winokur (Vocalise)
Tongue and Cheek Episode 20: Windows Mirrors Floors (Vocalise)
Tongue and Cheek Episode 21: Crowds
Tongue and Cheek Episode 22: Liquid Breath (Vocalise)

Tongue and Cheek Episode 22

Tongue and Cheek Episode 22
WGXC Tuesday, June 2nd, 2020, 2PM–3PM

Liquid Breath—A note on liquid breath and a selection of breathing exercises from past broadcasts. 

(Vocalise)

Tongue and Cheek Episode 21

Tongue and Cheek Episode 21
Montez Saturday, April 25th, 2020, 11AM–12PM
WGXC Tuesday, May 5th, 2020, 3PM–4PM

Crowds
Missing crowds, fractured voices and bodies, synchronous and asynchronous crowds, eyes and voice tracing in two directions at once, sitcom without a laugh track, quilts and syncopating sentences, crowding ourselves, “sensation already overfull,” Silvesterklausen walking with bells from house to house in the Appenzell from Thomas Lüchinger’s Guets Neus, effects of alcohol on the sound of a crowd, making a crowd of the body. 

Tongue and Cheek Episode 20

Tongue and Cheek Episode 20
Montez Saturday, March 28th, 2020, 11AM–12PM
WGXC Tuesday, April 7th, 2020, 3PM–4PM

Windows Mirrors Floors 
Hardwood, its pores, chatoyance, spalting, and checking, defining exercises, dancing in and out of windows, finding and holding a personal horizon-line, tracing one’s profile in the mirror, “aee…I,” “hey,” “no, no, no,” conversations in the mouth, wide and narrow soap swings (“ka”-“ta” / “ga”-“lu”), putting the horizon on the mirror. Handel’s “Water Music,” Canned Heat, Carol Douglas, Joaquín Sabina and Rocío Dúrcal. 

(Vocalise)

Tongue and Cheek Episode 19

Tongue and Cheek Episode 19
WGXC Tuesday, March 3rd, 2020, 2PM–3PM
Montez Saturday, July 25th, 2020, 11AM–12PM

Resonators—with Zack Winokur—Releasing tension—breathing into your hands, visceral sphere, floating (in your breath and liquid-air around you), pulling a string of “tzss” out from your mouth, hanging from the ceiling like a puppet, mouth at the back of your head. Rooting (pushing down into the ground) and uprooting (pushing up against your own body) “see out of you back eyes…this is you back nose, smell out of your back nose…this is your back mouth. I want you to first taste out of back tongue” vocalizing out of your back mouth. Pushing on your fingers with your eyes. Finding the heaviness of limbs. Rudder. Elbow as the pelvis. Standing close to an opera singer. An opera singer’s bodily control (finding space) and inability to control. Singing with and without a pelvis. Singing through a straw.

Joined by Zack Winokur

Zack Winokur is a stage director, choreographer, and dancer. In 2017 Winokur, founded AMOC (American Modern Opera Company), which Winokur co-directs with composer Matthew Aucoin. AMOC is an ensemble of singers, musicians, and dancers committed to creating a body of new, discipline-colliding music-theater works that range from operatic stage work to creatively curated chamber events. Future highlights include directing Sondheim’s Sunday in the Park with George with the Los Angeles Philharmonic conducted by Gustavo Dudamel, Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde at the Santa Fe Opera, and a newly devised piece in collaboration with AMOC and the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, which tours the Bay Area, the Krannert Center, and comes to the Met Museum next fall. Highlights from last season include The Black Clown, an adaptation of the Langston Hughes poem starring Davóne Tines with music by Michael Schachter, at the Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center and the American Repertory Theater; Perle Noire: Meditations for Joséphine, with music by Tyshawn Sorey, text by Claudia Rankine, and starring Julia Bullock at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; a new production of Hans Werner Henze’s El Cimarrón starring Davóne Tines, also at the Met Museum; and a new piece for the Los Angeles Dance Project at the Luma Foundation in Arles, France.

(Vocalise)

Tongue and Cheek Episode 18

Tongue and Cheek Episode 18
Montez Saturday, Feb 29th, 2020, 11AM–12PM

Borrowing Tellings—with Dan J. Ruppel—Ekphrasis and persuading communication—voices bouncing around a room, voices bouncing around in history, 16th century forms of “truth telling” and recounting triumphal processions, “take a deep breath down,” triumphal arches and illustrations of triumphal carts, overworking and pumping the diaphragm, impersonating absence, the details of something that didn’t happen, Barbara Tennenbaum’s Persuasive Communication, embodying a room in the rhythms of one’s voice, “hu hu hey” and directing the voice, historians’ ekphrasis and verisimilitude, listening while speaking, Piffiaro’s “Trionfo di Bacco” and Stadtpfeiffer: Music of Renaissance Germany. 

Dan J. Ruppel is a writer and performer teaching art history and oratory at Roger Williams and Brown Universities. His academic research traces the lineages of the “Roman” triumph and the early modern “entry” ceremony as they appear in francophone festival books throughout the long sixteenth century, exploring how these ceremonies and their documents influence claims to truthful representation and political sovereignty on both sides of the Atlantic. His theatrical creations perform translations across time, media and language, exploring themes of passing and surrogation. These adventures have taken him from Pennsylvania to Transylvania, and from the forests of Quebec to community centers in Palestine.

sexypreggosluts com

(Ventriloquize)

Tongue and Cheek Episode 17

Tongue and Cheek Episode 17
Montez Saturday, January 2nd, 2020, 11AM–12PM

Talk to MePuppet with Ben Morgan-Cleveland—Ventriloquisms and coordinating limbs. Joined by Ben Morgan-Cleveland, leading exercises with puppets.

Ben Morgan-Cleveland is an art dealer turned artist. Solo exhibitions at Kai Matsumiya, Eli Ping, Shoot the Lobster, Doyers. Recently taught Special Projects class in Photography department at Pratt with Robert Snowden. Cofounded and ran Real Fine Arts from 2008 to 2018 with Tyler Dobson.

(Ventriloquize)

Tongue and Cheek Episode 16

Tongue and Cheek Episode 16
WGXC Tuesday, January 7th, 2020, 2PM–3PM
Montez Saturday, June 27th, 2020, 11AM–12PM

Waist Voice—with David Dixon— balancing on an axle at the hips and splitting the body in two, resonance of the jaw harp, articulation as the joining of bones, resonators moving down the body (head / nose / larynx / chest / stomach / hips / knees / toes), “there can be no words spoken that are not intimately connected to bodily sensations and rhythms,” Jerzy Grotowski resonators, Jens Christensen holding Eugenio Barba’s hand with the voice of his shoulder, “our lips had been required to perform the onerous and difficult task of procuring nourishment for our bodies. But our hands took over that task, releasing our mouths for the service of speech.” Cleaning the floor with the feet, imagining Lady Macbeth’s feet in Verdi’s Macbeth. “The prehensile toe,” Tadashi Suzuki’s “The Grammar of the Feet,” Odin Teatret, Honoré Balzac, Bill Callahan, Gregory of Nyssa.

Joined by David Dixon teaching the jaw harp. David Dixon is an artist, filmmaker, curator and currently founding director of the art gallery Cathouse FUNeral / Proper which opened in 2014 and Curator at 1GAP Gallery. His work has been exhibited at MoMA, Sculpture Center, Anthology Film Archives, Postmasters Gallery, Ryan Lee Gallery as well as within his own Cathouse project. Publications that have covered his work include ArtForum, artcritical, Huffington Post, The Guardian, Hyperallergic. He was born in Philadelphia, PA in 1968, holds a BFA from Parsons School of Design and MFA from Cornell University.

(Vocalise)

Tongue and Cheek Episode 15

Tongue and Cheek Episode 15
Montez Saturday, November 23rd, 2019, 11AM–12PM
WGXC Tuesday, February 4th, 2020, 2PM–3PM

Reeds—with Mauro Hertig— Single reeds and double reeds, idioglottal and heteroglottal reeds, creaking wood, “two bodies that must meet on like terms,” being rubbed the wrong way, pommer, crumhorn and zurna, not extending the voice but creating the voice outside of the body, Georgian polyphony, Choir of Shilda, Ensemble Basiani, Johannes Ciconia, and Crumhorn Consort.

Joined by Mauro Hertig, composer of ensemble, chamber and site-specific music. Mauro Hertig was born in Switzerland, and studied composition in Zurich and Graz. He was based in Vienna since 2014, and since 2017 has also been in New York. 

(Socialise)

Mauro Hertig

Tongue and Cheek Episode 14

Tongue and Cheek Episode 14
WGXC Tuesday, November 5th, 2019, 2PM–3PM
Montez Saturday, May 30th, 2020, 11AM–12PM

Valve Lashthrowing syllables with the mouth and catching them with the hands, spheres of environment, Douglas Ross, Harmony 1 with a washing machine, diagnosing machines and bodies as a reaching into them, valve lash, listening through gasoline, haptic motorcycle sounds, heart sounds and murmurs, seeing spheres of the mouth with the tongue, throwing and catching with the tongue, throwing language down the trachea, Harlan Lane on Rousseau feeling the vibrations of a cello, J. B. Barlow and W.A. Pocock.

(Vocalise)

Tongue and Cheek Episode 13

Tongue and Cheek Episode 13
Montez Saturday, October 26th, 2019, 11AM–12PM
WGXC Tuesday, December 3rd, 2020, 2PM–3PM

Cordiallyfarewells, undressing and dressing the voice “mm / ah,” layer of people, wrapping gifts, “polite speech is a kind of wrapping of thoughts and intentions,” politeness in the womb, “One good way to start a letter of refusal is to agree with the reader on some point. This establishes a feeling of working together… ‘We agree that a watch running only part of the time is useless,’” words to give others a feeling of power and other epistolary sympathies, governmentalities as extensions of the body, things you can suppose other people want, “ornamentation is as vast as the world—cosmos and cosmetics, appearance and essence. Ornament equals order and embellishment is equivalent to law,” hinging off the back of an other’s hand. Lillian Eichler Watson’s The Bantam Book of Correct Letter Writing, Joy Hendry’s Wrapping Culture, Harold E. Meyer, Agnes Denes, Matsuo Basho, Moondog, Emily Dickinson, Percy Sledge 

(Socialise)